LUMILYON

The Mobile Art and Photography of Nettie Edwards

Month: September, 2013

2013 American Aperture Awards

copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013

copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013

it’s been announced elsewhere, but I’m thrilled to share the news, here on my blog, that I have been named Mobile Photographer of the Year in the 2013 ax3 American Aperture Awards.

A selection from my portfolio of iPhone photographs: Versailles Grand Canal also won the Mobile Landscape, Seascape and Nature category and my iPhone video artwork Harriet’s Breathing won the Mobile Moving Image and Video category.

The AX3 – American Aperture Awards are described as: “an international open call for photography possessing uncommon vision. This opportunity is open to photographers of all backgrounds who capture images that make the unknowable known. Our goal is to celebrate the most iconic photos taken by new and emerging talent, as well as professionals, from around the world and award their photographic insights.”

I’m proud beyond words to have won these awards and to see that Mobile Photography and Art are finally being recognised as legitimate art forms.

Please take time to enjoy the work of the other winners, both camera and mobile here

Mise en Abyme

copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

The Conversation: Montmartre, Paris 2012

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copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

The Conversation 02: St Suplice, Paris February 2012

In A Country Churchyard: colour work from St. Mary’s Painswick

In A Country Churchyard by Lumilyon
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013
In A Country Churchyard
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013

Copyright Nettie Edwards @ lumilyon 2013

copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013

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copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2013

Exhibition News: Arrangements in Black and Grey: Black and White Photography in the 21st century

Musée Gallo Romain, Lyon 2012

Musée Gallo Romain, Lyon 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Musée Gallo Romain, Lyon 2012

Musée Gallo Romain, Lyon 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Musée Gallo Romain 2012

Musée Gallo Romain, Lyon 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Versailles Grand Canal February 2012

Versailles Grand Canal February 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Versailles Grand Canal December 2012

Versailles Grand Canal December 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Versailles Grand Canal February 2012

Versailles Grand Canal February 2012
copyright Nettie Edwards @lumilyon 2012

Soon after I returned from Mobile Photo Paris, in November of last year, I was contacted by Roger Watson, curator of the Fox Talbot Museum at Lacock Abbey In Wiltshire. Roger had seen one of my Versailles series featured on the New York Times Lens blog and was interested to know how iPhone photographs looked when printed. Prior to Mobile Photo Paris, some of my work had been printed and exhibited by others in the US and Europe, most notably by Daria Polichetti for the 2012  LA Mobile Festival. Daria is renowned and respected for her print expertise and I trust her implicitly, but in an ideal world, I prefer to be more “hands on”. After exploring a number of local digital printing options, I’d become disheartened. Digital artists work with light and I had not completely realised the vital role that back light plays in my images, until I saw them off-screen. This led me to reflect upon whether my photographs should be printed at all, or whether it might be better to exhibit them on a screen or as projections on walls. The prospect of exhibiting my work in a print exhibition at the Bastille Design Centre in Paris, forced me to reconsider. My friend Celia Wickham, director of Contemporary Art Holdings and the Wet Paint Gallery in Cirencester, herself an accomplished artist and print maker, put me in touch with her printer, Allan Snaith, who runs his business, UIS Arts, from out of an old Stables, just outside Colchester. Allan is a Master Printer and member of the Guild of Fine Art Printers. Not only is he a joy to work with, he is the only printer that I have found whose prints look exactly as they do on my iPhone, iPad and computer screens.

So I was able to tell Roger Watson that, in my personal opinion, my iPhone photographs looked very good indeed when printed. To my delight, he agreed with me and selected six prints for inclusion in an exhibition of Black and White photography that he was in the process of curating. Arrangements in Black and Grey: Black and White Photography in the 21st Century opened in April and features the work of six British photographic artists who work in black and white: Deborah Parkin, Katie Cooke, Mark Voce, Anthony Jones, Trevor Ashby and myself.  The exhibition invites visitors to consider whether black and white photography has relevance in the 21st century. Lacock Abbey was the home of British photography pioneer William Fox Talbot and has been described as Photography Ground Zero. I’m proud to be the first ever mobile photographer to have my work exhibited there, to see photographs shot in Hipstamatic and Lomora, hanging alongside stunning images captured with Polaroid, pinhole, digital and film, printed in traditional silver gelatin, as well as inkjet technology.

Arrangements in Black and Grey runs at the Fox Talbot Museum until October 22nd 2013, so you can still catch it, if you’re quick!